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Kingsland High School
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2016 – 2017
 
 
Course Registration Guide
 
 
Grades 9 – 12
 
 
knights logo - small
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
Independent School District #2137
Kingsland Public Schools
May 8, 2017
 
 
TABLE OF CONTENTS
 
Graduation Requirements......................................................................................... 1
Your Courses Count................................................................................................ 2
Four Year Planning Guide......................................................................................... 3
College in School (CIS) Courses................................................................................ 3
 
Course Descriptions
Agriculture Education.............................................................................................. 4
English................................................................................................................. 7
Fine Arts.............................................................................................................. 8
Health................................................................................................................ 10
Mathematics........................................................................................................ 10
Physical Education................................................................................................. 12
Science............................................................................................................... 13
Social Studies...................................................................................................... 15
Technology Education............................................................................................ 17
World Language................................................................................................... 19
Independent Study................................................................................................ 20
CIS Course Description.......................................................................................... 20
 
 
 
GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
All high school students need to meet the following graduation requirements to earn a diploma:
 
1.         Complete the following course credits:
 
SY2016-2017 Grade 12 27
SY2016-2017 Grade 11 27
SY2016-2017 Grade 10 27
SY2016-2017 Grade 9 27
         
 
 
 
 
 
 
Text Box: If you have questions concerning 
graduation requirements at 
Kingsland High School, 
please contact the Counseling Office at 
507-346-7276 or 507-352-2731 ext. 3009
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Your Courses Count
 
Preparing for Academic Success
 
Minimum Admission Requirements
For Public Universities and Colleges
 
  Minnesota South Dakota North Dakota Wisconsin
English 4 years 4 years 4 years 4 years
Math
(4 years U of M)
3
Algebra
Geometry
Algebra II
3
Algebra
Geometry
Algebra II
3
Algebra
Geometry
Algebra II
3
Algebra
Geometry
Algebra II
Science Physical Sci
Biology
Chemistry
Physical Sci
Biology
Chemistry
Physical Sci
Biology
Chemistry
Physical Sci
Biology
Chemistry
Social Studies 3 years 3 years 3 years 3 years
World Language 2 years No No 2 years
Other Courses 1 year
Creating or Performing Arts
.5 year
Computer Science
AND
1 year Performing Arts
No 2 years
 
4 Year College Entrance Test Requirements
 
The ACT Test is required for all 4 year colleges and universities.  Students entering UMD,
UM-Twin Cities, UW-Madison and Carleton College must take the ACT writing test in addition to the ACT Test.
For the most updated college entrance information, consult the college or contact the KHS Counseling Office.
 
General Information
 
  • Teacher Assistant (TA) – Kingsland High School is not in the business of assigning a student to a TA period unless no other options are available.  No student will be assigned a TA period if a course not previously taken is available regardless of student interest in taking the course.
 
  • Open-Period (OP) – Kingsland High School reserves the right to assign an OP to students enrolled in three or more College In the Schools (CIS) course in a semester.  An OP will be assigned if the student’s schedule allows.
 
  • Work Release (WR) – Kingsland High School does not have WR.  A student with an after school job will be dismissed at the final bell.  No early release will be allowed.
 
  • Work Placement (WP) – Kingsland High School does have WP through the Agriculture Department.  All WP is coordinated by Mrs. Brogan, Agriculture Teacher.
 
  • Advisory (RUtR) - Ramp-Up to Readiness™ is a guidance program that helps students in grades 7 through 12 reach the following goals by the end of high school:
  • Academic Readiness
  • Admissions Readiness
  • Career Readiness
  • Financial Readiness
  • Personal & Social Readiness
 
 
 
KINGSLAND HIGH SCHOOL FOUR YEAR PLANNING GUIDE
Students must register for 7 periods each semester
 
 
Grade 9 – Class of 2020
Required Classes Credit
1. English 9 (Writing, Speaking, Literature) 1 credit
2. Civics .5 credit
3. Geography .5 credit
4. Geometry 1 credit
5. PLTW Physical Science 1 credit
6. Physical Education 9 .5 credit
7. Art or Music (can be taken in any grade 9-12) 1 credit
Elective Classes 1.5 credits
 
Grade 10 – Class of 2019
Required Classes Credit
1. English 10 (Research, Writing, Literature) 1 credit
2. American History 1 credit
3. Algebra II 1 credit
4. Biology 1 credit
5. Health 10 .5 credit
6. Art or Music (can be taken in any grade 9-12) 1 credit
Elective Classes 1.5 credits
 
Grade 11 – Class of 2018
Required Classes Credit
1. English 11 (American Literature) 1 credit
2. World History 1 credit
3. Math (CIS, PLTW, DE or CSE, Technical) 1 credit
4. Science Elective (can be taken in grades 11-12—either Chemistry, Food Chemistry or Physics) 1 credit
5. Art or Music (can be taken in any grade 9-12) 1 credit
Elective Classes 2 credits
 
Grade 12 – Class of 2017
Required Classes Credit
1. Economics OR Ag Economics .5 credit
2. Political Science .5 credit
4. Science Elective (can be taken in grades 11-12—either Chemistry, Food Chemistry or Physics) 1 credit
5. Art or Music (can be taken in any grade 9-12) 1 credit
6. English 12 1 credit
Elective Classes 3 credits
 
College in the Schools (CIS) Classes Include:
CIS Algebra (3) CIS General Chemistry I (4)
CIS Animal Science (4) CIS General Chemistry II (4)
CIS Beginning Spanish I (4) CIS European History I (3)
CIS Beginning Spanish II (4) CIS European History II (3)
CIS Intro to Literature (3) [11th gr] CIS Plant Propagation (4)
CIS Literature (3) [11th gr] CIS Political Science (3)
CIS Calculus (3) CIS Band (1)
CIS Freshman English (3) [12th Gr] CIS Trigonometry (3)
Exposition & Argumentation (3) [12th Gr]
 
CIS Course Descriptions – SY2016-2017
 
CHEM1201 General Chemistry I (4 Credits)
This is the first course of a two semester sequence in general inorganic chemistry, Atomic Theory, stoichiometry, chemical reactions, thermochemistry, chemical bonding, molecular structure, and atomic structure, periodicity, and the gas phase. This course is for students intending to transfer or pursue Bachelor's preparation and/or careers in chemistry and the other physical sciences, engineering and health sciences (medicine, pharmacy, veterinary medicine, four-year nursing). Prerequisite: Math 1110 or concurrent registration in Math 1110. MnTC (Goals 3/NS and 2/CT); (4 Cr - 3 lect, 1 lab)
 
CHEM1202 General Chemistry II (4 Credits)
This is the second course of a two-semester sequence in general inorganic chemistry. Content includes an introduction to organic chemistry, solutions, kinetics, equilibrium, acids and bases, thermodynamics and electrochemistry. This course is for students intending to transfer or pursue Bachelor's preparation and/or careers in chemistry and the other physical sciences, engineering and health sciences (medicine, pharmacy, veterinary medicine, four-year nursing). Prerequisite: MATH 1110 and CHEM 1201. MnTC (Goals 3/NS and 2/CT); (4 Cr - 3 lect, 1 lab)
 
ENGL1101 Composition I (3 Credits)
This is an introductory college writing course designed to help students develop effective writing skills for college level work. Students learn to generate ideas and organize them into unified, coherent essays. Methods of instruction vary, but most sections combine individual conferences and peer review with regular class meetings. Prerequisites: A grade of C or higher in ENGL 0960 or appropriate placement score. MnTC (Goals 1/CM and Goal 2/CT); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)
 
ENGL 1103 Introduction to Literature (3 Credits)
This is an introductory literature course designed to increase a student’s critical and analytical skills in reading. Included is a study of literature by genre: the short story, drama, poetry and the novel. Emphasis in the selections is on American and English literature although some works in translation are read. Critical and interpretive papers are required. MnTC (Goals 6/ HU and 2/CT); (3 Cr – 3 lect, 0 lab)
 
ENGL1104 Composition II:  Argument (3 Credits)
This second semester composition course is designed as a continuation of ENGL 1101. It teaches the skills needed to write clear and coherent essays using different modes of expository prose such as process, comparison and contrast, classification, and definition. It will culminate in the study of argumentative writing in which the student learns to defend a position and argue a thesis with reason and evidence. Prerequisite: ENGL 1101 MnTC (Goal 1/CM and Goal 2/CT); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)
 
ENGL2242 American Literature II (3 Credits)
This course explores developments in American Literature between 1492 and 1865. Students will explore both historical and formal developments affecting literature of this period, as well as similarities/differences among the works covered. Specific issues addressed may include early written representations of America, the influence of Puritanism on American writers, important documents of the Federalist period, and the American Romantic movement, including Transcendentalism. MNTC (Goals 6/HUand 7/HD); (3 Cr – 3 lect, 0 lab)
 
HIST1011 European Hisory I (3 Credits)
This survey course explores the European history from its origins to "Glorious Revolution" of 1688 in England. The course will especially focus on the Greco-Roman roots of western civilization, the medieval period, the Renaissance and the Protestant Reformation. MnTC (Goals 5/SS and 8/GP); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)
 
HIST1012 European History II (3 Credits)
This survey course looks at modern European civilization from the "Glorious Revolution" of 1688 in England to present. It focuses on the political revolutions of the nineteenth-century, industrialism, imperialism, and the twentieth-century decline of European power. MnTC (Goals 5/SS and 8/GP); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)
 
HORT 1001 Plant Propagation (4 Credits)
Principles and techniques of propagating plants by seeds, cuttings, grafts, buds, layers, and division. Lectures on principles; labs on practice of various propagating techniques. (4 Cr - 4 lect, 0 lab)
 
MATH1110 College Algebra (3 Credits)
This course covers the basics of college level algebra emphasizing understanding of the basic principles through investigation. The topics covered range from a basic algebra review to exploration of linear, quadratic, exponential, and logarithmic functions along with a study of rational expressions, inverse relations, function operations, complex numbers, and systems of equations. Prerequisites: MATH 0570 with grade of C or better or appropriate placement placement test score. MnTC (Goals 4/MA and Goal 2/CT); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)
 
MATH1120 Trigonometry (4 Credits)
This course builds on the computational, problem solving, and graphing skills learned in previous math courses. The topics covered in this course include trigonometric ratios, functions, graphs, identities, equations, inverse trigonometric functions, solution of the general triangle and other applications, conic sections, polar coordinates, and complex numbers. Prerequisite: MATH 1110 or equivalent. MnTC (Goals 4/MA and 2/CT); (4 Cr- 4 lect, 0 lab)
 
MATH1210 Calculus & Analytic Geometry (5 Credit)
This course covers the basic principles of calculus through investigation. The course begins with a review of functions and continues with limits, rates of change, derivatives, differentiation rules, applications of derivatives, and anti-derivatives. Concepts are presented graphically and numerically as well as algebraically. Prerequisites: MATH 1120 or MATH 1115 with a grade of C or better; or instructor permission. MnTC (Goals 4/MA and 2/CT); (5 Cr – 5 lect, 0 lab)
 
MUSC1125 Instrumental Ensemble (1 Credit)
This course provides the opportunity to perform as a member of an instrumental ensemble. The group, or groups, vary in size and scope according to student interest, and may include jazz, traditional band, rock, and/or other musical styles. Students are encouraged to audition and/or meet with the instructor prior to the start of the semester. This ensemble rehearses two hours per week. MnTC (Goals 6/HU and 2/CT); (1 Cr – 1 lect, 0 lab)
 
PSCI1010 American Government and Politics (3 Credits)
This course is a study of the United States national government in all of its aspects with special emphasis placed on constitutional theory, major governmental institutions and the national political culture and practice. MnTC (Goals 5/SS and 9/EC); (3 Cr - 3 lect, 0 lab)
 
SPAN1001 Beginning Spanish I (4 Credits)
This course is designed for the beginning-level student with no previous knowledge of Spanish. Course content focuses on developing speaking, listening, reading and writing skills in accordance with the American Council of Teachers of Foreign Language and Culture (ACTFL) standards. Emphasis is placed on learning useful vocabulary for a variety of everyday situations. Cultural materials develop an awareness and understanding of the arts, customs, history, culture and literature of Spanish-speaking people and countries throughout the world. This study creates a comparison of cultural, social and linguistic differences and similarities. This course also explores how the ideas and values of Spanish speaking cultures are expressed in the arts and humanities within a social and historical context. MnTC (Goals 6/HU and 8/GP); (4Cr – 4 lect, 0 lab)
 
SPAN1002 Beginning Spanish II (4 Credits)
This course is designed for students who have completed SPAN 1001 or approximately one year of high school Spanish. Course content focuses on developing speaking, listening, read and writing skills in Spanish in accordance with the American Council of Teachers of Foreign Language and Culture (ACTFL) standards. Emphasis is placed on learning useful vocabulary for a variety of everyday situations. Cultural materials develop an awareness and understanding of the arts, customs, history, culture and literature of Spanish-speaking people in countries throughout the world. This study creates a comparison of cultural, social and linguistic differences and similarities. In addition, this course explores how the ideas and values of Spanish-speaking cultures are expressed in the arts and humanities within a social and historical context. MnTC (Goals 6/HU and 8/GP); (4Cr - 4lect, 0 lab)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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AGRICULTURE
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>>Required<< (or Economics)
AG ECONOMICS
Grade: 12
Credit: .5
This is an approved economics course for the social studies requirements for Kingsland High School.  Economics is the study of how people coordinate their wants and desires, given scarce resources and the decision-making mechanisms, social customs, and political realities of their societies. Decisions made by consumers, farmers, agricultural businesses, investors and the government interact to determine the allocation of scarce resources. Economics is a way of thinking about the world based on a set of principles that are useful for understanding almost any economic situation, from decisions that individuals make to the workings of highly complex international financial markets.  Students will:
  • develop an understanding of micro and macroeconomic concepts and its application to agriculture
  • participate in a variety of simulations to strengthen a student’s understanding of material
 
BASIC ELECTRICITY
Grades: 10-11-12
Credit: .5
This course will provide students with a basic understanding of electricity and its importance to our society. Students will have the opportunity to learn basic wiring skills through practical wiring exercises using switches, outlets, lamp receptacles and circuit breaker boxes.  The course is intended for students who would like to learn more about basic wiring and apply the skills learned to do some wiring in the future as a home owner. This course would be a good experience for students planning to continue their education at a technical college.  Students will:
  • develop a basic understanding of wiring concepts
  • perform practical wiring exercises
 
BEGINNING WELDING
Grades: 9-10-11-12
Credit: .5
Welding is divided into a two-fold approach. First, through the use of texts and visual materials, the student is introduced to the fundamentals, which will enable him/her to understand what is happening during the welding process. Second, through independent and practical welding exercises, he/she learns the various manual operations involved in arc and oxyacetylene welding. Students will have the opportunity to build small welding projects and enter in local and state competitions.  The course is intended for students who would like to learn more about welding processes and improve their mechanical skills. This course would be a good experience for students planning to continue their education at a technical college.  Students will need to furnish their own safety glasses and welding gloves.  Students will:
  • develop a basic understanding of arc, MIG, and oxy welding
  • utilize concepts learned to build various small metal projects
 
CIS: ANSC 1101-ANIMAL SCIENCE
(University of Minnesota)
Prerequisite: Top 50% Class
Grades: 11-12
Offered in EVEN numbered years (ex. 2016-2017­) Credit: Science
           .5 HS
           4 College
This is an approved science course for the science requirements for Kingsland High School.  This is a University of Minnesota Introduction to Animal Science (ANSC 1101) course with emphasis on genetics, physiology and nutrition. The course includes a study of production systems relative to the horse, dairy, sheep, poultry, swine and beef industries. Additional topics include man’s relationship to animals, current issues and future perspectives of animal agriculture. Students will experience laboratories at the University of Minnesota relating to Animal Science.  Students will be concurrently enrolled at the University of Minnesota and upon successful completion of this class, students will have four semester credits posted to their college transcript. 
Students will:
  • develop an understanding of genetics, reproduction, and nutrition
  • explore horse, dairy, sheep, poultry, swine, and beef industries
  • identify breeds of animals
  • be provided with hands on learning of concepts through labs at the University of Minnesota
 
CIS: HORT 1001-PLANT PROPAGATION
(University of Minnesota)
Prerequisite: Top 50% Class
Grades: 11-12
Offered in ODD numbered years (ex. 2017-2018) Credit: Science
           .5 HS
           4 College
SEM 1 Only
This is an approved science course for the science requirements for Kingsland High School.  This is a University of Minnesota Plant Propagation (HORT 1001) course with emphasis on principles and techniques of propagating plants by seeds, cuttings, grafts, buds, layers, and division. There will be lectures on principles and labs on practice of various propagating techniques.  Students will carry out the laboratory exercises in the Kingsland ag greenhouse.  Students will be concurrently enrolled at the University of Minnesota and upon successful completion of this class will have four semester credits posted to their college transcript.  Students will:
  • develop an understanding of plant reproduction
  • perform labs demonstrating the various propagating techniques
  • utilize technology to compose lab journals
 
FISHERIES & WATER RESOURCES
Grades 9-10-11-12
Credit: .5
Class Limit: 24
SEM 1 Only
This course will involve a study of our water resources as it relates to supply and use, water quality and water use planning in our society. The course will be centered around watersheds with an emphasis on the Spring Valley Creek Watershed.  Much of the class time will be spent studying and working on the Spring Valley Creek and its surrounding habitat areas. The brown trout and aquatic insects will be the focus point of the study and how it can be used to determine the quality of the total environment in which it lives. The course will provide excellent preparation for students who would like to seek employment in water resources and/or pursuing further education at a technical school or college.  Students will have the opportunity to build a custom fishing pole, which will cost him or her $45.  Students will:
  • develop an understanding of the world's freshwater supply
  • identify aquatic insects and fish
  • have the opportunity to build a custom fishing pole
  • perform water tests on the Spring Valley Creek and analyze results
 
FOOD CHEMISTRY
Grades: 11-12
Credit: 1.0
 
Food Chemistry has two components – a discussion and a laboratory – which is designed to give students an opportunity to observe and conduct hands-on experiments.  This course explains how water, carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, vitamins and minerals react in foods; biochemical and functional properties, enzymes, food additives (emulsifiers, pigments, colors, flavors, preservatives and sweeteners) and texture as related to properties in food systems and during processing.  Students will also be introduced to food science through product development.  As related to food chemistry, this course will also look into soil chemistry and how it relates to food production and biofuel chemistry with food crops.  This course is approved for the Chemistry requirement at Kingsland High School.
 
HORTICULTURE
Grades: 9-10-11-12
Credit: .5
SEM 2 Only
This course will explore the basic principles of horticulture. Areas of instruction will include plant taxonomy, plant identification, landscape design, landscape installation, floral design principles, floral design projects, basic greenhouse management, plant propagation, and lawn and turf grass establishment and maintenance.  Plants will be grown as greenhouse crops and students will complete various floral design projects.  The primary aim of this class is to develop the interests, appreciations, understandings and competencies needed by those students who will be seeking employment and advancement in horticultural occupations, agribusiness and/or production agriculture.  Students will also be designing and planting the food shelf garden.  Students will need to pay $10 lab fee to help cover the cost of flowers used during the floral design unit.  Students will:
  • develop an understanding of the horticulture industry
  • indentify fresh flowers, annuals, and potted house plants
  • develop various floral design arrangements including corsage, boutonnieres, bud vase, centerpiece, etc.
  • plan and develop the community garden
 
LEADERSHIP
Grades: 10-11-12
Offered in EVEN numbered years
(ex. 2016-2017)
Credit: .5
This course is designed to allow students to focus on personal development and leadership skills. Students will be able to apply competencies learned in the classroom to activities centered in organizations where they are presently members. Organizing, directing and leading a meeting and/or an organization will be emphasized. Students will also learn what creates conflict in-groups and strategies for working through conflict. This class will require students to be active participants in a variety of activities.  Students will:
  • gain hands on experience in communication, goal setting, and teamwork
  • participate in a service learning project
  • demonstrate proper meeting conduct
  • develop materials to prepare themselves for career exploration
 
PLANT SCIENCE
Grades: 9-10-11-12
Offered in EVEN numbered years
(ex. 2016-2017)
Credit: .5 Science
SEM 1 Only
This is an approved science course for the science requirements for Kingsland High School.  This course will investigate scientific concepts relating to economic plants. Specific topics will include taxonomy and classification, distribution and adaptation, anatomy and physiology, inter- relationship of environmental factors, reproduction, genetics and plant breeding, health and pathology, biofuels, uses of plants, biotechnology and the study of plants by human kind in a managed environment.  Laboratory activities will provide opportunities for problem solving through practical application to learn scientific concepts.  Whole plant system applications to current issues will be presented.  The course is intended for students who will be working with plants and in particular agricultural crops and/or attending technical school or college.  Students will:
  • gain an understanding of plant parts and their functions
  • identify common insects or diseases that affect Southeast MN agriculture
  • utilize current science techniques while studying biotechnology and utilizing the Mayo Science trailer
 
SMALL ANIMALS
Grades: 9-10-11-12
Offered in ODD numbered years
(ex. 2017-2018­)
Credit: .5
This course will concentrate on companion animals.  Areas of discussion include care, safety, nutrition, rights and welfare, breed identification, and more!  An in-depth focus is put on animal breeds and identifying them through pictures.  Students will be able to make educated decisions on which pet best fits various situations.  Small Animal Care and Management also allows for the exploration of careers in the small animal industry.  Students will:
  • identify common dog, cat, fish, rabbit, and breed species
  • gain a basic understanding of nutrition and how it relates to small animal
  • explore history, anatomy, care, and diseases related to small animal species
 
SMALL ENGINES
Grades: 9-10-11-12
Credit: .5
Class Limit: 20
This course will give students an understanding of how to do basic maintenance and repair procedures on four- stroke and two-stroke cycle engines. Areas of instruction include basic engine principles, compression, cooling, lubrication, and ignition systems. Students will learn how to perform proper engine measurements and maintenance skills. Students will disassemble and reassemble an over-head valve four-stroke engine and two-stroke engine. Tune-up and troubleshooting techniques will be a part of the course study. The course is intended for students who would like to learn more about internal combustion engines and improve their mechanical skills. This course would be a good experience for students planning to continue their education at a technical school. Students will:
  • develop a basic understanding of 2 and 4 stroke principles
  • demonstrate proper use of common precision measurement tools
  • disassemble and reassemble small gas engines
 
 
 
 
SUMMER AGRIBUSINESS SEMINAR
Grades: Incoming 9 – Present 9-10-11
Credit: .5
This course is available to all incoming ninth grade students and all present students who will not be graduating in 2016.  The course is recommended for students who are presently enrolled in agricultural courses or who are looking toward a career in the agriculture industry.  This course allows students to design an individual education plan and pursue an in-depth study of an agriculture topic of their choice. Each student will need to complete 60 hours of instruction with 24 hours being through classroom and laboratory experiences and the rest as individualized instruction.  This course will take place throughout the summer months when school is not in session.  This class will be 100% laboratory experience. The course is intended for students who would like to learn more about an agriculture area that may not be possible in a formal classroom setting. Skills and experiences learned could help in future high school courses or educational aspirations after high school.  Students will:
  • develop an educational plan that will fit his or her interest
  • participate in the community garden located at the local food shelf
 
WILDLIFE
Grades: 9-10-11-12
Offered in EVEN numbered years
(ex. 2016-2017­)
Credit: .5
This course will provide students with a foundation in the ways and means of management of wildlife with a strong emphasis on large wildlife mammals of Minnesota.  The issues surrounding a safe and well managed harvest will serve as the central focus of the course.  The white-tailed deer will be the main mammal studied.  Areas of study will include a historical perspective, characteristics and life cycles, habitat management, benefits to communities and the agriculture industry.  Students will be expected to be active learners throughout each instructional unit.  Identification of Minnesota mammals and birds will also be covered.  Careers in wildlife will be investigated.  Students will:
  • develop an understanding of common Minnesota Mammals including the Whitetail Deer, Gray Wolf, and Black Bear
  • identify common mammals, fish, and bird species found in Minnesota
 
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ENGLISH
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Graduation Requirements: (4 credits total – English 9, English 10, English 11 and English 12)
>>Required<<
ENGLISH  9
Grade: 9
Credit: 1.0
This class will focus on writing, speaking, and literature. The students will have the opportunity to practice the processes involved in preparing and presenting speeches, writing 300 – 500 word essays, and reading and analyzing a variety of pieces of literature.  They will
  • learn and demonstrate active listening
  • prepare and present up to four speeches (1 informative, 1 ceremonial, 1 persuasive and
    1 demonstrative)
  • practice paragraph development
    • organization
    • introductions, transitions, and conclusions
    • revision and editing
  • write up to five essays (compare/contrast, narrative, persuasive, expository, and biographical based on an interview)
  • read and analyze stories, poetry, non-fiction pieces, at least one novel, and at least one play
  • work on vocabulary expansion
 
>>Required<<
ENGLISH 10
Research, Writing and Literature
Grade: 10
Credit: 1.0
Students will read a variety of literary works including examples of the folk tradition, short stories, poetry, a novel, drama and some non-fiction. Students will learn the terminology of literary analysis and use it to interpret what they read.  Students will also complete projects, presentations, group and partner exercises, composition, and vocabulary work related to the readings.
Students will also learn the step-by-step process of how to put together a 6-page research paper with an accurate bibliography. They will learn how to research, how to gather and cite information. They will also learn to create bibliographies and note cards. Other aspects of writing to be covered are thesis statements, essay organization, editing and proofreading.
 
>>Required<<
ENGLISH 11
American Literature
Grade: 11
Credit: 1.0
In this course students will have the opportunity to study various authors and time periods in American literature and to become acquainted with the works that have helped to shape us as a nation.  They will
  • read and analyze stories, poetry, non-fiction pieces, at least one novel, and at least one play
  • write paragraphs and essays
  • work on vocabulary expansion.
>>Required<<
ENGLISH 12
Grade: 12
Credit: 1.0
This class will offer students the opportunity to build on skills they have been developing throughout their high school years.  Students will
  • work on vocabulary expansion
  • improve their grammar and punctuation skills
  • improve comprehension skills by reading and analyzing stories and plays (British literature)
  • write paragraphs and essays demonstrating appropriate organization, sentence structure, spelling, vocabulary, and usage
  • build on speaking skills as time allows
 
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FINE ARTS
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3 DIMENSIONAL DESIGN
Grades: 9–10–11-12
Credit: .5
This class is an introduction to three-dimensional design (sculpture).  Students will:
  • learn about the basic principles of design
  • use the basic principles critically and creatively
  • complete sketches, plans, and in-class projects
  • gain experience working with a variety of art materials (clay, wire, paint, multi-media) and techniques
  • gain a better appreciation and understanding of 3-D Art
 
BAND
Prerequisite: Prior Band Experience or Approval of Director
Grades: 9-10-11-12
Credit: 1.0
Band is a music performance class and service organization for students in grades 9-12. Its class structure includes rehearsals, lessons, and performances.  While in Band, students will:
·         explore a variety of band literature, continue to develop pedagogical and musical skills through music.
·         receive individual or small group instruction to challenge the student on an individual level.
·         participate in concerts and selected pep band and marching band events
·         be given the opportunity to participate in solo/ensemble contests, festivals, pep bands, parades, and other community/school functions.
 
CERAMICS
Grades: 9–10–11-12
Credit: .5
This class is an introduction to ceramics.  Students will:
·         learn about the process of ceramics from start to finish
·         learn skills and techniques using clay and glazes
·         learn hand-building techniques in this class as well as some wheel techniques   
  • combine the skills and techniques they have learned with their own creativity to create several pottery art pieces
 
CHOIR
Prerequisite: Prior Choir Experience or Approval of Director
Grades: 9-10-11-12
Credit: 1.0
 
·         The choral music program at Kingsland is designed to develop high degrees of musicianship, teamwork, cooperation and vocal skills.  The majority of class time is spent on rehearsal of vocal techniques and choral literature appropriate to age and skill.  Students are required to attend group/individual lessons and to perform in concerts.                   
Each student is given opportunity to audition for select honors groups and to participate in contest.

 
CULTURAL ARTS
Grades: 9–10–11-12                         
Credit: .5
This class presents a broad range of visual arts and cultural experiences; including historical references, ethnic arts and crafts, popular and contemporary fine arts and the influence of computer arts. While in this class, students will:
  • Experience the visual culture which surrounds and shapes our daily lives.
  • Expand their knowledge of the visual arts and its place in the human experience.
  • Explore issues concerning the power of representation, the formation of cultural identities and the functions of creative production.
  • Understand the meanings of visual narratives and critical reflection.
 
DIGITAL ARTS
Grades: 9–10–11-12                         
Credit: .5
This class is an introduction to digital arts.  This class will be 100% computer generated art and will center around the computer program Adobe Photoshop Elements.  Students will:
·         gain a better appreciation for digital arts
·         learn how to use the computer program, Adobe Photoshop Elements, and its tools to produce creative art
  • create and document knowledge and creativity through in-class projects and posts on personal blog
  • complete photography, photo enhancement, digital scrapbooking, blog assignments and projects
·         students interested in a career in technology or graphic design should take this course
·         need to use a digital camera (the school has a few that can be checked out but students can use their own if they have one) and a will need their own 4G flash drive to store their work
 
DRAWING I
Grades: 9–10–11-12
Credit: .5
This class is an introduction to drawing.  This class is recommended for students wanting to develop their drawing skills.  It is highly recommended for any students looking towards a career in the arts such as architecture, graphic design or fine arts.  Students will:
  • gain a better appreciation for the art of drawing
·         explore and develop skills using a variety of drawing methods, techniques and materials (pencil, pen & ink, colored pencil, marker, chalk pastels, multi-media)
·         refine the use of the elements of art and principles of design first explored in Art 8 
  • begin to understand how to draw the world around them in a correct, detailed and interesting way
 
PAINTING
Grades: 9–10–11-12
Credit: .5
This class is an introduction to painting.  Students will:
·         learn about the basic elements and techniques of painting
  • gain experience working with painting materials and techniques
  • use creativity when using basic artistic skills to create their own unique artwork
·         complete several in-class projects/paintings
·         Students may be asked or required to purchase personal supplies, such as brushes and painting boards or other items

 
PRINTMAKING
Grades: 9–10–11-12
Credit: .5
This class is an introduction to the classic process of Printmaking, as well as many other options relating to making prints. Student will:
  • Understand the historically and classic technical means of printmaking to include; woodblock, lino cuts, papermaking and many more.
  • Be exposed to new and current-day means of printmaking.  
  • Successfully complete sketch and present plans for in-class projects.
  • Explore printmaking techniques using; paper, fabric or a unique variety of options.
  • Research and report on artists, artwork and techniques.
 
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HEALTH
---
Graduation Requirements:
  • .5 credit total
  • Health 10
>>Required<<
HEALTH 10
Grade: 10
Credit: .5
Students will be exposed to a variety of health-related topics including:
  • Human Body Systems      
  • Nutrition/Fitness
  • Substance Use/Abuse
  • Human Sexuality
  • Important Teenage Health Issues
  • CPR/AED
Class consists of group & individual projects, readings, lecture, group discussion, and research.
 
---
MATHEMATICS
---
Graduation Requirements:
  • 3 credits total
>>Required<<
ALGEBRA II
Prerequisite: Geometry
Grades: 10-11
Credit: 1.0
NCAA
This course builds the necessary foundation for all future work in mathematics.  Preparation for the MCA Mathematics Assessment will be a large part of this class. Topics covered include:
·         basic concepts of algebra
·         inequalities
·         linear equations and functions
·         products and factors of polynomials
·         rational expressions
·         irrational and complex numbers
·         quadratic equations and functions
 
 
COLLEGE ALGEBRA
Prerequisite: Algebra II
Grades: 11-12
Credit: 1.0
 
This course is designed for seniors planning to enroll in a 2 or 4 year post-secondary institution
and plan to work for a degree in a non-math related career. Seniors taking this class will be prepared for college placement exams as well as college algebra courses taken during early years of post-secondary education. Topics to be covered/reviewed include: 
·         Algebra I and Algebra II
·         Geometry
·         Trigonometry
·         Probability and Statistics
 
CIS: MATH 1110 COLLEGE ALGEBRA
(Riverland Community College)
Prerequisite: GPA 3.0 (Gr 11)/2.5 (Gr 12) & Accuplacer Qualifying Score
Grades: 11-12
Credit: .5 HS
           3 College
 
This course covers the basics of college level algebra emphasizing understanding of the basic principles through investigation.
·         Review of basic algebra 
·         Integer and rational exponents
·         Introduction to equations and inequalities
·         Linear equations
·         Introduction to functions
·         Introduction to higher-order polynomial and rational functions  
·         Quadratic functions and regression
·         Introduction to exponential and logarithmic functions  
·         Exponential functions
·         Systems of equations and inequalities
·         Solving systems of equations of 2+ variables
·         Probability (topic may be covered if time permits)
 
CIS: MATH 1120 TRIGONOMETRY
(Riverland Community College)
Prerequisite: MATH 1110
Grades: 11-12
Credit: .5 HS
           3 College
 
This course builds on the computational, problem solving, and graphing skills learned in previous math courses.
·         Introduction to trigonometric functions
·         Trigonometric graphs and models
·         Trigonometric identities
·         Inverse trigonometric functions & equations
·         Applications of trigonometry
·         Conic Sections and Polar Coordinates
 
COMPUTER SCIENCE
Prerequisite:
Grades: 11-12
Credit: 1.0
 
PLTW’s CSE course teaches students how to solve problems using computational thinking and skills.  CSE introduces students to professional programming languages and platforms and encourages students to use these tools to discover, collaborate, and create.  Using Python and other languages, students develop their own app, create dynamic websites, and construct their own graphical user interface.
CSE is not only aligned to the Computer Science Teacher’s Association (CSTA) 3B standards, but also challenges students to discover connections between computer science and digital electronics and data visualization. 
 
>>Required<<
GEOMETRY
Prerequisite: Algebra I
Grade: 9
Credit: 1.0
NCAA
This course is designed to develop the student’s ability to reason logically and to enable the student to understand the structure of geometry and its relationship to algebra. Topics:
·         properties of angles and lines
·         geometric reasoning/logic
·         parallel and perpendicular lines
·         triangle congruence/attributes of triangles
·         polygons and quadrilaterals
·         similarity
·         right triangle trigonometry
·         perimeter/circumference/area
·         spatial reasoning
·         circles
 
PLTW:  Digital Electronics (DE)
Grades: 11-12
Credit: 1.0
 
Digital Electronics (DE) is the study of electronic circuits used to process and control digital signals.  DE is the foundation of all modern electronic devices such as cellular phones, MP3 players, laptop computers, digital cameras and HD televisions.  The major focus of DE is to expose students to the process of combinational and sequential logic design, teamwork, communication methods, engineering standards and technical documentation.  The following is a description of each unit in the DE course.
·         Fundamentals of Analog & Digital Electronics
·         Combinational Logic
·         Sequential Logic
·         Microcontrollers
 
---
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
---
Graduation Requirements:
  • .5 credit total
  • Physical Education 9
ATHLETIC TRAINING
Grades: 10-11-12
Offered in EVEN numbered years
(ex. 2016-2017)
Credit: .5
Students will learn the responsibilities of the athletic trainer.  Some of the topics covered will include employment, educational requirements, physical conditioning of athletes, sports nutrition, protective devices and equipment, and sports injuries. Class structure will include research, reading, discussion and lecture, and group projects.
 
DAPE (Developmental Adapted Physical Education)
*Students qualifying under Special Education DAPE guidelines receive services.
Credit: 1.0
 
PERSONAL/LIFETIME FITNESS
Grades: 9–10–11-12
Offered in EVEN numbered years
(ex. 2016-2017)
Credit: .5
The focus of this class will be on the student’s individual fitness with the goal being to show improvement throughout the quarter.  The program will include:
  • Fitness Assessments
  • Cardiovascular Fitness Activities
  • Designing/Following a Fitness Program
  • Lifetime Sports & Activities
  • Weight Training
  • Health-Related Fitness Activities (speed, agility, strength, endurance)
Class will consist of daily participation, written work, and personal fitness assessments.
 
>>Required<<
PHYSICAL EDUCATION 9
Grade: 9
Credit: .5
Students will be required to participate in the following activities:
  • Group & Individual Fitness Activities
  • Individual & Team Sports
  • Fitness Assessments
  • Recreational Activities/Games
Class will consist of daily participation in a variety of activities.  Written work may also be required.
 
PHYSICAL EDUCATION 10-12
Prerequisite: PE 9
Offered in ODD numbered years
(ex. 2017-2018­)
Credit: .5
Students will be required to participate in a variety of activities including:
  • Group & Individual Fitness Activities
Individual & Team Sports
  • Fitness Assessments
  • Recreational Activities/Games
Class will consist of daily participation, fitness assessments, and written work.
 
TEAM SPORTS/OFFICIATING
Prerequisite: PE 9
Offered in ODD numbered years
(ex. 2017-2018­)
Credit: .5
This course is designed for a student who wishes to coach and/or officiate sports offered at the high school level.  Topics will include:
  • Coaching/Officiating Philosophies
  • Techniques of Coaching
  • MSHSL Rules/Regulations for the Following Sports: 
  • Football, Volleyball, Basketball, Softball, and Baseball
  • Officiating Techniques
Class will consist of readings, presentations, projects, class speakers, written work, and participation in team sports & officiating techniques.  Class will be held in the gym and in the classroom.
 
---
SCIENCE
---
Graduation Requirements:
  • 3 credits total
  • Physical Science (1) – Grade 9
  • Biology (1) – Grade 10
  • Electives (1)
>>Required<<
BIOLOGY
Prerequisite: PLTW: Physical Science
Grade: 10
Credit: 1.0
Biology is the study of the diversity of living things and the common processes of life.  Students taking this course will develop a strong foundation for making informed biological and environmental decisions.  Though this is an introductory into basic biology, this course will also be rigorous enough to prepare the student to take AP Biology in the future.  Students will take the MCA Science Test in the spring.  Topics:
  • Nature of Science
  • Biochemistry
  • Cells
  • Molecular genetics
  • Mendelian genetics
  • Diversity of Organisms
  • Animal systems
  • Animal behavior
  • Plant systems
  • Ecology
 
CHEMISTRY
Grades: 11-12
Offered in EVEN numbered years
(ex. 2016-2017)
Credit: 1.0
Chemistry is a course in which students study and observe the properties of matter. Students will learn through lectures and laboratories. Topics covered include: atomic structure, common elements and the periodic table, stoichiometry, gas laws, and acids and bases. This course is a very good introduction to innovative thinking expected at the college level.
  • Study of Atoms
  • Chemical Combinations
  • Behavior of Gases, Liquids and Solids
  • Chemical Equations
  • Molecular Theory
 
 
CIS: CHEM 1201 – GENERAL CHEMISTRY I
(Riverland Community College)
Prerequisite: Math 1110 or concurrent registration in Math 1110
Grades: 11-12
Credit: .5 HS
           4 College
This is the first course of a two semester sequence in general inorganic chemistry.  This course is for students intending to transfer or pursue Bachelor’s preparation and/or careers in chemistry and the other physical sciences, engineering and health sciences (medicine, pharmacy, veterinary medicine, four-year nursing).
  • Atomic Theory
  • Stoichiometry
  • Chemical reactions
  • Solution stoichiometry
  • Thermochemistry
  • Chemical bonding
  • Molecular structure
  • Atomic structure, periodicity and the gas phase
 
 
CIS: CHEM 1202 GENERAL CHEMISTRY II
(Riverland Community College)
Prerequisite: MATH 1110 and CHEM 1201
Grades: 11-12
Credit: .5 HS
           4 College
This is the second course of a two-semester sequence in general inorganic chemistry. This course is for students intending to transfer or pursue Bachelor’s preparation and/or careers in chemistry and the other physical sciences, engineering and health sciences (medicine, pharmacy, veterinary medicine, four-year nursing).
  • Introduction to organic chemistry
  • Intermolecular forces and solids and liquids
  • Physical properties of solutions
  • Chemical kinetics
  • Chemical equilibrium
  • Acids and bases
  • Acid-base equilibria and solubility equilibria
  • Thermodynamics
  • Redox reactions and electrochemistry
 
 
PHYSICS
Grades: 11-12
Offered in ODD numbered years
(ex. 2017-2018­)
Credit: 1.0

This is an introductory course in which students will apply their knowledge of science and math to explain real world phenomena. This course is math intensive. Topics of study include:

  • Motion in one and two dimensions
  • Newton’s laws
  • Forces and gravitation
  • Circular motion
  • Momentum
  • Energy
  • Waves
 
 
PLTW:  HUMAN BODY SYSTEMS
Grades: 10–11-12
Offered in ODD numbered years
(ex. 2017-2018)
Credit: 1.0
Students examine the interactions of human body systems as they explore identity, power, movement, protection, and homeostasis. In this course, students:
  • design experiments
  • investigate the structures and functions of the human body
  • use data acquisition software to monitor body functions such as muscle movement, reflex and voluntary action, and respiration
  • students build organs and tissues on a skeletal manikin
  • work through interesting real world cases play the roles of biomedical professionals to solve medical mysteries.
>>Required<<
PLTW: PRINCIPLES OF ENGINEERING (POE)
Grade: 9
Credit: 1.0
Principles of Engineering from Project Lead The Way is a required class.  It is designed to give students a more detailed understanding of physics and mathematical concepts used in the field of engineering.  Students will:
  • Explore how the mechanical advantages gained by using simple machines are used to produce powerful and sophisticated industrial machines and equipment
  • Learn how engineers and technicians use math, science and technology to solve engineering problems that benefit people
  • Learn math applications that will focus on using basic trigonometry and algebra to explore physics concepts such as statics and kinematics
  • Be introduced to a variety of systems including mechanical, fluid, electrical and control
  • Be exposed to test procedures used in materials science labs
A basic introduction of the chemistry needed for the more advanced sciences will also be provided.
 
PLTW:  PRINCIPLES OF THE BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES (PBS)
Grades: 11-12
Credit: 1.0
 
The Principles of the Biomedical Sciences (PBS) course is divided into eight units designed to introduce students to the study of the human body and human medicine.   Students investigate the human body systems and various health conditions.  They determine the factors that led to the death of a fictional person, and investigate lifestyle choices and medical treatments that might have prolonged the person’s life.  The following is a description of each unit in the PBS course.
 
  • Human Body Systems
  • Infectious Diseases
 
 
  • Heart Disease
  • Medical Intervention
 
 
  • Diabetes
  • Grant Proposals
 
 
  • Sickle Cell Disease
 
   
PLTW: PHYSICAL SCIENCE
Grade: 9
Credit: 1.0
         
Principles of Engineering from Project Lead The Way is a required class.  It is designed to give students a more detailed understanding of physics and mathematical concepts used in the field of engineering.  Students will:
  • Explore how the mechanical advantages gained by using simple machines are used to produce powerful and sophisticated industrial machines and equipment
  • Learn how engineers and technicians use math, science and technology to solve engineering problems that benefit people
  • Learn math applications that will focus on using basic trigonometry and algebra to explore physics concepts such as statics and kinematics
  • Be introduced to a variety of systems including mechanical, fluid, electrical and control
  • Be exposed to test procedures used in materials science labs
A basic introduction of the chemistry needed for the more advanced sciences will also be provided.
 
---
SOCIAL STUDIES
---
>>Required<<
AMERICAN HISTORY 10
Grade: 10
Credit: 1.0
NCAA
This class teaches an in-depth history of the U.S., beginning with reconstruction following the Civil War and ending with current time. 
  • Review of Early American to Civil War
  • Reconstruction
  • Expansion
  • Industrial Revolution
  • Progressive Era
  • Imperialism (World Power)
  • World War I
  • 1920’s
  • The Great Depression, New Deal
  • World War II
  • Cold War
  • Civil Rights Movement
  • Vietnam War
  • Nixon
  • Conservative Movement
  • New Millennium
 
 
CIS: HIST 1011 European History (Ancient to 1688)
Grade: 11
Credit:  .5 HS
           3 College
 
CIS: HIST 1012 European History (1688 – Present)
Grade: 11
Credit:  .5 HS
            3. College
This survey course explores the European history from its origins to the “Glorious Revolution” of 1688 in England. The course will especially focus on the Greco-Roman roots of western civilization, the medieval period, the Renaissance and the Protestant Reformation.
  • Near Eastern roots of European civilization
  • Classical and Hellenistic Greek civilization
  • Roman Republic
  • Rise and decline of the Roman Empire
  • Early Middle Ages
  • Feudalism
  • High Middle Ages
  • Renaissance
  • Europe’s global empire
  • Reformation
  • Wars of religion
  • Scientific revolution
  • Enlightenment
  • Absolutism and the rise of constitutionalism
  • The English revolution of 1688
 
This survey course looks at modern European civilization from the “Glorious Revolution” of 1688 in England to present. It focuses on the political revolutions of the nineteenth-century, industrialism, imperialism, and the twentieth-century decline of European power.
  • French Revolution
  • Napoleon
  • Nationalism and liberalism in Europe
  • International reaction to Napoleon and the French Revolution
  • Industrialism
  • Socialism and capitalism
  • Rise of Germany
  • New imperialism
  • Intellectual and cultural movements in late 19th century Europe 
  • World War I
  • Russian Revolution
  • Post World War I Europe
  • The Great Depression
  • Rise of Fascism
  • World War II
  • Cold War
  • The End of European colonies
  • European Unity
  • Collapse of USSR and the End of Cold War
  • Post Cold War Europe
 
CIS AMERICAN GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS
Grade: 12
Credit: .5
NCAA
This course is a study of the United States national government in all of its aspects with special emphasis placed on:
  • constitutional theory
  • major governmental institutions
  • national political culture and practice
  •  
>>Required<<
CIVICS 9
Grade: 9
Credit: .5
NCAA
This class teaches the role of government and citizenship and the relationship between the two in the United States.   The focus of the class will be an introductory look at basic U.S. government concepts.  Current events and important issues from the news will focus a large part of the class.
  • The Constitution                     
  • Bill of Rights
  • Citizenship Rights, Duties & Responsibilities
  • Political Parties
  • Voting, elections
  • Legislative Branch
  • Executive Branch
  • Judicial Branch
  • State, Local Government
 
 
>>Required (OR Ag Economics)<<
ECONOMICS
Grade: 12
Credit: .5
NCAA
This course will cover the basics of economic theory and how consumers and producers make choices that shape the American economy.  A variety of methods will be used to teach the key principles of economics including presentations, research, lecture, discussions and the stock market game. Topics discussed will include:
  • Resources and Scarcity
  • Choices
  • Economics Systems
  • Microeconomics
  • Economic Institutions/Stock Market
  • Macroeconomics and Political Policy
  • Personal Finance
 
>>Required<<
GEOGRAPHY
Grade: 9
Credit: .5
Geography is a 9th grade quarter class that goes over the basic physical systems (landforms, climate, vegetation) and Human Systems (cultural geography, political geography) and their interactions at international, national, and local levels.
  • Physical Earth
  • The Human World
  • Canada
  • Australia, Oceania, Antarctica
  • Nations of the Pacific, Antarctica
  • Western Europe
  • Eastern Europe
 
>>Required<<
POLITICAL SCIENCE
Grade: 12
Credit: .5
NCAA
In this course, students will gain a more in-depth understanding of American’s government system.  Students will be taught through a wide variety of methods including research, lecture, current events, debates and presentations.  Topics will include:
  • Political Ideology
  • American Political Parties
  • Civil Liberties
  • Civil Rights
  • Current Political Issues
 
 
PSYCHOLOGY
Grades: 11-12
Offered in ODD numbered years
(ex. 2017-2018­)
Credit: .5
NCAA
This class will function as a survey course that touches on all of the various fields within psychology.  Students will learn through lecture, demonstration, experimentation and internet research.  Topics will include the following:
  • Biological Influences on Behavior
  • Social Psychology
  • Intelligence and Thinking
  • Learning
  • Memory
  • Childhood Development
  • Sensation and Perception
  • Motivation
  • Personality
  • Consciousness, Sleep and Hypnosis
 
SOCIOLOGY
Grades: 11-12
Offered in EVEN numbered years
(ex. 2016-2017)
Credit: .5
NCAA
This course deals with the group structure of society.  Man’s behavior as a product of the whole web of social living – called society – is studied.  This course provides the crucial significance of groups in shaping human behavior – essential in our modern world. A variety of methods will be used, including student presentations, film, small group discussion, group or partner projects, and some lecture. Topics covered will include:
  • American Cultures and Values
  • Socialization
  • Ageism
  • Poverty
  • Racism
  • Crime/Deviance
 
>>Required<<
WORLD HISTORY
Grade: 11
Credit: 1.0
NCAA
This course will focus on the key developments and changes of the entirety of human history.  Students will learn through a wide variety of methods including group projects, film, student presentations, lecture, primary sources, and the textbook. Topics studies will include:
  • Prehistory
  • Greco/Roman History
  • The Middle Ages
  • Renaissance and Reformation
  • Age of Revolution and Industrialization
  • Imperialism
  • World War I and the Russian Revolution
  • The Rise of European Dictators
  • World War II and the Holocaust
  • The Cold War
  • Modern Terrorism
  • The Rise of the European Union
 
---
TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION
---
BUILDING CONSTRUCTION & MAINTENANCE
Grades: 11-12
Credit: 1.0
Class Limit: 20
This course covers technical aspects of carpentry with emphasis on development of intermediate skills. The course content includes floor systems, wall and ceiling framing, roof framing, introductions to concrete, reinforcing materials and forms, windows and exterior doors, and basic stair layout. Background for Success: Any experience using hand or power tools and equipment would be helpful. Basic measuring skills are also beneficial.
 
 
PLTW:  COMPUTER INTEGRATED MANUFACTURING (CIM)
Grades: 10–11-12
Offered in ODD numbered years
(ex. 2017-2018)
Credit: 1.0
How are things made? What processes go into creating products? Is the process for making a water bottle the same as it is for a musical instrument? How do assembly lines work? How has automation changed the face of manufacturing? While students discover the answers to these questions, they’re learning about:
  • history of manufacturing, robotics and automation
  • manufacturing processes
  • computer modeling
  • manufacturing equipment
  • flexible manufacturing systems
 
PLTW:  CIVIL ENGINEERING & ARCHITECTURE (CEA)
Grades: 11-12
Offered in EVEN numbered years
(ex. 2016-2017)
Credit: 1.0
Students learn about various aspects of civil engineering and architecture and apply their knowledge to the design and development of residential and commercial properties and structures. In addition, students:
  • use 3D design software to design and document solutions for major course projects.
  • communicate and present solutions to their peers and members of a professional community of engineers and architects.
 
PLTW:  INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING DESIGN (IED)
Grades: 10–11-12
Offered in EVEN numbered years
(ex. 2016-2017)
Credit: 1.0
In the Introduction to Engineering Design (IED), students use 3-D solid modeling design software to help them design solutions to solve proposed problems.  Students will learn how to document their work and communicate solutions to peers and members of the professional community.  IED’s major focus is to expose students to the design process, research and analysis, teamwork, communication methods, global and human impacts, engineering standards and technical documentation.  The following is a description of each unit in the IED course:
  • Design Process
  • Design Exercises
  • Reverse Engineering
  • Open-Ended Design Problems
 
WOODS I
Grades:
Credit: .5
Class Limit: 20
Intro to Wood Tech explores the basics of woodworking as it applies to today’s technologies. The student will learn:
  • Hand and power tool safety and familiarization
  • Wood characteristics and selection
  • Woodworking processes
  • Assembly and evaluation
  • Blueprint reading
  • Sawing, sanding, jointing, joinery gluing and finish using a hands-on approach by building a variety of projects.
  • Safety is always emphasized.
 
WOODS II
Grades:
Prerequisite: Woods I
Credit: .5
SEM 2 Only
Class Limit: 15
This is an advanced class designed for students to create higher level wood projects.  Woods II allows the student:
  • to explore their own upper boundaries of fine craftsmanship in the woodworking field
  • an opportunity design their own projects and work on larger group projects
  • a hands-on opportunity to learn about the basics of carpentry and construction
  • to hear speakers from woodworking industry
  • go on field trips to increase understanding and foster working relationships.
 
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WORLD LANGUAGE
---
CIS: SPAN 1001 BEGINNING SPANISH I
(Riverland Community College)
Prerequisite: Spanish I & II
Grades: 11-12
Credit: .5 HS
           4 College
This course is designed for the beginning-level student with no previous knowledge of Spanish. Course content focuses on developing speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills in accordance with the American Council of Teachers of Foreign Language and Culture (ACTFL) standards. Emphasis is placed on learning useful vocabulary for a variety of everyday situations. Cultural topics will be presented to develop cultural awareness:
  • greetings, farewells, and introductions
  • descriptions
  • interests, sports, hobbies, and pastimes
  • family
  • dates and time
  • classroom and academic life
  • personal preferences, likes/dislikes
  • basic personal information
  • pronunciation
  • cultural topics
 
CIS: SPAN 2001 BEGINNING SPANISH II
(Riverland Community College)
Prerequisite: SPAN 1001
Grades: 11-12
Credit: .5 HS
           4 College
This course is designed for students who have completed SPAN 1001 or approximately one year of high school Spanish. Course content focuses on developing speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills in Spanish in accordance with the American Council of Teachers of Foreign Language and Culture (ACTFL) standards. Emphasis is placed on learning useful vocabulary for a variety of everyday situations. Cultural topics will be presented to develop cultural awareness.
  • Descriptions
  • Places and directions within the city
  • Travel and vacation
  • Seasons and weather
  • Clothing and shopping
  • Daily routines
  • Food and cooking
  • Numbers
  • Personal information
  • Holidays and celebrations
  • Pronunciation
  • Cultural topics
 
SPANISH 1
Grades: 9-10-11
Credit: 1.0
 
The purpose of Spanish 1 is to give the student a solid framework for learning the language. The fundamental vocabulary and grammar skills will be learned through speaking, writing, listening, and reading activities. Topics:
  • weather
  • numbers
  • alphabet
  • presentations
  • time/date
  • adjectives
  • places in a town
  • sports and leisure
  • present tense verbs
 
  • family
  • nouns
  • ser vs. estar
  • near future tense
  • immediate past tense
  • present progressive tense
  • geography
  • clothing
  • reflexive verbs
 
 
SPANISH 2
Prerequisite: Spanish 1
Grades: 10-11-12
Credit: 1.0
Students continue to learn the vocabulary and grammar fundamentals of the language. Students are expected to read, write, speak, and listen in the target language. The topics from Spanish 1 are briefly reviewed. Additional topics learned:
  • gustar
  • people/occupations
  • saber vs. conocer
  • daily activities
  • personal care
  • food
  • preterit tense
  • por vs. para
  • prepositions
  • places
  • transportation/car parts
  • future tense
  • health
  • imperfect tense
  • adverbs
  • demonstrative adjectives
 
 
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INDEPENDENT STUDY
---
Advanced Art
Teacher Recommendation - Limited to very small numbers
Credit: .5
 
 
Advanced Woodworking
Teacher Recommendation - Limited to very small numbers
Credit: .5